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Rudolph Centennial Exhibit Catalogs: Now Available Through Amazon

This pair of catalogs was produced in association with the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation’s two exhibits, celebrating Rudolph’s 100th centenary year, 2018. They are available as a set—   and now: easily purchased through Amazon   .    Photo: Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

This pair of catalogs was produced in association with the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation’s two exhibits, celebrating Rudolph’s 100th centenary year, 2018. They are available as a set—and now: easily purchased through Amazon.

Photo: Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

CELEBRATING A MAGNIFICENTLY CREATIVE ARCHITECT’S 100TH BIRTHDAY

Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) would have been 100 in 2018, and—to recognize & celebrate that—the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation mounted two exhibits: Paul Rudolph: The Personal Laboratory and Paul Rudolph: The Hong Kong Journey.

This pair of exhibits (and Rudolph’s increasing recognition) were praised in an article in The New York Times. The bad news is that both exhibits have closed—but the good news is that the pair of catalogs—well illustrated records of the exhibit, supplemented by additional fascinating material—have been published by the PRHF.

“The Personal Laboratory” exhibit focused on the homes and workspaces that Rudolph crated for himself, wherever he settled. It’s catalog is richly illustrated, containing much of that material—as well as fascinating documents & memoirs of people who knew and worked for Rudolph.    Photo: Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

“The Personal Laboratory” exhibit focused on the homes and workspaces that Rudolph crated for himself, wherever he settled. It’s catalog is richly illustrated, containing much of that material—as well as fascinating documents & memoirs of people who knew and worked for Rudolph.

Photo: Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

“The Hong Kong Journey” exhibit focused on work that Paul Rudolph did in Hong Kong. In the last decade-and-a-half of his career, Rudolph was called upon by clients in Asia: Hong Kong, Jakarta, and Singapore—and he built large and significant in that part of the world. In Hong Kong you can see the pair of remarkable skyscrapers he designed: the Bond Centre (a.k.a. the Lippo Centre). They, and several other very intriguing projects were the focus of the exhibit, which also includes interesting essays by Rudolph’s Hong Kong associate, Nora Leung; as well as an introduction by Robert de Alba.    Photo: Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

“The Hong Kong Journey” exhibit focused on work that Paul Rudolph did in Hong Kong. In the last decade-and-a-half of his career, Rudolph was called upon by clients in Asia: Hong Kong, Jakarta, and Singapore—and he built large and significant in that part of the world. In Hong Kong you can see the pair of remarkable skyscrapers he designed: the Bond Centre (a.k.a. the Lippo Centre). They, and several other very intriguing projects were the focus of the exhibit, which also includes interesting essays by Rudolph’s Hong Kong associate, Nora Leung; as well as an introduction by Robert de Alba.

Photo: Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

NOW MORE EASILY AVAILABLE

The catalogs are sold as a set—and have been available through the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation’s website’s “Shop” page—and continue to be.

But now they are now also easily orderable through AMAZON—at this page:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1792304218/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_1?keywords=Paul+Rudolph+personal+laboratory&qid=1554318008&s=books&sr=1-1-fkmrnull

Many people prefer the ease of shopping though Amazon—and we are pleased to the catalogs available by this method too.

Image: Amazon.com

Image: Amazon.com

Build-Your-Own-Rudolph!

When you want to build a Rudolph, but lack the upper body strength. Photo: Mini Materials

When you want to build a Rudolph, but lack the upper body strength. Photo: Mini Materials

TABLE-TOP CONSTRUCTION

 You’ve probably seen the growing number of Lego kits devoted to great architecture: sets that allow you build distinguished buildings such as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum, his Fallingwater Residence, London’s Buckingham Palace, Berlin’s famous Brandenburg Gate, and even Mies’ Farnworth House!  [Hint: These special sets, in Lego’s “Architecture” series, often sell out - so if you’re a design-oriented Lego-phile, get them while you can!]

Fallingwater in Lego. Image: Amazon

Fallingwater in Lego. Image: Amazon

One has to admit that it must have been a challenge to translate some of these buildings into such sets: not all of these buildings’ geometries readily lend themselves to the modules of Lego’s system. Even so, we commend all attempts to encourage more audiences to appreciate architecture—and especially salute Lego’s efforts.

But hey, Lego! - Why don’t you take on a building that would wonderfully translate into an impressive Lego structure:  Paul Rudolph’s most famous design, the Yale Art & Architecture Building (now redidicated as Rudolph Hall).

Now that would make an exceptional Lego set!

Anybody want to start a petition?

Imagine this - in Lego! Photo:  Gunnar Klack  from Wikipedia

Imagine this - in Lego! Photo: Gunnar Klack from Wikipedia

Meanwhile:  What’s the table-top builder to do?

MATERIALS AT LILLIPUTIAN SCALE

 There is an answer!

 For those of you who want to build at home - or rather, in your home, right on your kitchen table - there are sets of diminuitive construction materials that will allow you to get started.

For example:

  • There are miniature concrete blocks, made of real concrete, and real miniature bricks—which can be laid with minute amounts of mortar.

  • There are scale sets of miniature wood 2x4’s, 2x6’s, and plywood—all ready for your handy hands to assemble!

  • There are even mini palettes, to help you transport these materials across your table-top construction site! [And it’s been suggested that they make good drink-coasters too.]

Take a look at the full range of materials and accessories that Mini Materials offers. We’re sure you’ll be inspired to get building!

P.S. 

The only problem:  

There are no ribbed concrete blocks—like the kind that Rudolph created & used for many of his projects. 

Anybody want to start another petition?

Rudolph inspired dollhouse for your 'miniature Modernist'

The Dylan House. Photo: Brinca Dada

The Dylan House. Photo: Brinca Dada

Who says a dollhouse has to be Victorian? If you are looking for a cool holiday gift to inspire a young future architect, we found some amazing examples at Brinca Dada. The above caught our attention for an obvious reason:

Inspired by the minimalist masterpieces of Paul Rudolph and Tadao Ando, the brinca dada Dylan Dollhouse House with Furniture features a concrete-and-glass feel, but with the breezy openness of a beachfront home. Floor-to-ceiling windows open to allow natural light into the house and play from many angles. The Dylan House has five living spaces on three levels: living room/dining room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and roof patio. The Dylan House Furniture set contains 23 pieces...enough to fill five living spaces on three levels: living room/dining room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and roof patio. Furnish their imagination with this awesome complete dollhouse and furniture set.

We’re not sure the above is very Rudolphian, but it may have taken a cue from his Florida work:

Do you see a resemblance? Neither do we…. Photo: Kelvin Dickinson, Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

Do you see a resemblance? Neither do we…. Photo: Kelvin Dickinson, Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

Brinca Dada also makes other options for your miniature Modernist which remind us a little of Paul Rudolph’s Quadruplex at 23 Beekman Place:

The Bennett House. Photo: Brinca Dada

The Bennett House. Photo: Brinca Dada

All that’s missing is a lot of chrome and some Plexiglas furniture. And is that hole on the roof where the bathtub is supposed to be?

Celebrate your (or someone else's...) Inner Brutalist this holiday season

Photo: Jonathan Thai & Mike Yim of Aggregate Watches

Photo: Jonathan Thai & Mike Yim of Aggregate Watches

Are you a fan of Brutalism (and who isn’t, really?) Looking for a cool gift for yourself or a friend that shows your love of all things concrete? Introducing the Masonic - the first watch to feature a lightweight concrete dial and bezel.

Launched in August of 2017, the watch is the centerpiece of a kickstarter campaign setup by Aggregate Watches. Designers Jonathan Thai & Mike Yim joined Hendson Lin and Alexandra Burton to start the campaign. According to the kickstarter site:

Aggregate was conceived from the idea of experimenting with concrete in unconventional ways. We believed that we could create beautiful products using concrete, re-imagined in a different context.

The honest design approach is the best approach, where the material and form serve to captivate the audience. Concrete is the medium, and the medium is the message. The design is concrete, in its raw form.

The concrete used in ‘The Masonic’ is a special, proprietary cement blend that we have developed, so we can manufacture the components of the watch to be both lightweight and durable for daily wear.

Photo: Jonathan Thai & Mike Yim of Aggregate Watches

Photo: Jonathan Thai & Mike Yim of Aggregate Watches

The watches are now available at Aggregate’s website in 6 colors: Gravel Gray, Oat Brown, Charcoal Black, Pacific Navy, Bay Brown, and Rose Gold.